Wednesday, 24 March 2010

Oliver Bryce Yates



Oliver Bryce Yates
Sydney, Australia
flickr blog
Cookies and Cream











Is photography part of your main schtick or is it rather a pursuit on the side?

Finance in Photography is like gambling. The house always wins.


Does living in Sydney predestinate to skate and surf?

I think it is a broader question than that. I think that being an outcast or a fuckup is more of a predestinate factor than location.


Both of your sites' names are about sweets & bakery. Any specific reason for this?

Sub-consious thoughts about food coupled with the juxtoposition of placing grotesque pictures with that of a polietly named site.


You don't seem to shoot any digital photos. Why do you concentrate on film?

I could be technical and explain how digital doesn't replicate film in the green spectrem or I can simply say that there is nothing better than looking forward to getting a roll of film back and going on an adventure into the city having no idea what worked and what failed.


Which kind of pictures would you say you like more in other artists works: 'straightforward', clear images or pictures that play with light/colours/haze etc?

It really depends on the subject. I have always seen good photography in two classes. You can either shoot something extrodiary in a basic manner or you can shoot something ordinary in an extrodinanry manner. Colour and haze is always a good way to make up for ordinary subject matter.


What made you start your side project 'Cookies&Cream'?

To create a thinktank of sorts that is not ridgid in its construction. It is evolving to include a store that will sell others books, books released through a Cookies & Cream brand, limited run artists shirts and with some luck a free magazine here in Australia.


Is there a place you traveled to where you felt like you couldn't stop making pictures of the surroundings/setting?

My hometown Newcastle has me reinspired


Small gigs or big festivals?

Small ones. Festivals draw more assholes.


Even if this might sound cliché-ish, and it probably is, but looking at your flickr at times made me feel like watching Lords of Dogtown. If you have watched it, do you like that movie?

I haven't ever seen it so im not too sure. I watched Paranoid Park recently and I was cringing too much and had to stop watching simply due to some of the dialouge. Kids remains one of the only honest films, though obviously exagerated.


When running around and about town, how do you protect your camera(s) from damage?

I was just talking about this the other day with a friend. I don't even have a lense cover and I throw it in a small canvas bag with coins, pens, key, the works. I have no idea how my current camera hasn't been completly ruined.


What is your Plan A for life?

What I am doing right now


One place/country/city you would love to visit at next chance?

Go back to New York. I know, what a cliche.


Your favorite way to travel?

Lightly.



The real deal. Be sure to visit his gallery and blog, check out Cookies and Cream!



Sunday, 21 March 2010

Craig Nunn


Craig Nunn
Cambridge, England
flickr website
internet forever

















How did it all start photography-wise?

I went from snapshots to photographs about three years ago. I had a friend who worked for Lomography in Vienna, and they hooked me up with an LC-A. I've tried other film cameras since, but the LC-A wins every time.


Looking at your pictures, you're the master of travels. If you'd have to guess, how many pictures did you shoot while traveling?

It varies. While I was in India I shot about ten rolls, whereas in Morocco I only shot two. Sometimes I'll use a roll in one day and then go a week without taking a single shot. It all depends on how inspired I am by what I'm seeing. I lived and worked for a few years in China and in Poland, and after a while in one place you start to forget the 'exoticism' of a place and see the normality underneath. I'd like to think a mixture of both comes across in my photography.


Also, while you traveled, which cuisine did you like the most?

My perfect day in food would be thus: I'd wake in the morning and have Moroccan mint tea with crepes in a French colonial-era street cafe. For lunch I'd eat a huge plateful of homemade pierogi ruskie from Poland, with a side of pickled cabbage, carrot and beetroot. Mid-afternoon I'd stop off for some tasty hot Indian gulab jamun, and at night I'd spend a few hours sitting outside a filthy little family-run Chinese barbecue restaurant eating anything-and-everything-on-a-stick and drinking Tsing Tao beers.


Why did you call your short film The Darjeeling Unlimited?

I know that Wes Andersen has his haters, but I think his films should be taken for what they are; namely stylised fictional worlds. Personally, I'm a big fan.

India has always been a big draw for me, as I'm sure it has for many people. My grandad was stationed there with the British Army for 6 years before the outbreak of the Second World War. That interest was passed on to my dad, and in turn to me, so when I heard Anderson was releasing a film set in India, I was intrigued.

I loved the film (The Darjeeling Limited) for what it was, a romanticized portrayal of India. The reason I called my short film The Darjeeling Unlimited was half-laziness, half me trying to say that we scratch the surface of India. We saw a bit more of what a tourist normally sees. We got off the beaten track and took risks, had death threats, got caught up with unsavoury characters, battled monkeys, which at the time were silly and sometimes scary, but we came out of it with awesome memories and experiences.


In The Darjeeling Unlimited, what exactly is going on in those street scenes with people cheering-dancing starting from 3:40?

That's at the border with Pakistan near Amritsar, where they have a daily ceremony whereby soldiers from each side take turns to do ridiculous marches towards the border gate and square up a each other. It's kind of like a military breakdance competition. We happened to be there on Indian Independence Day, so the crowd was even wilder with patriotic fervor than usual.


Do you agree with the notion of the world being shrunk to a "global village"?

Absolutely. I'm still deciding whether it's a good thing or a bad thing.


Next to film and photography, you're making music, too. What is taking up the most of your time right now? And how does it all fit together?

My dayjob is taking up the vast majority of my time! Music fits around that, and photography fits around everything.


Is there a London based band you're fond of?

Stairs To Korea, aka Will Vaughan. I first heard about him after he asked me to shoot some promotional photos of him, and I've since become a friend as well as a fan of his work.


What would you say is overrated and what is underrated in photography?

Overrated: Photographs of people standing in the 'Crystal Castles' pose, naked people, backs of heads, triangles, hipsters, fisheye, live music photography, bokah.
Underrated: The understatement.


Is there a photographer you admire? What is your favourite picture shot by him/her?

I admire photographers whose photographs of places I've never been make me want to go.


You favourite movie character so far?

Totoro, the ultimate benevolent being.



Amazing collection and work. Be sure to visit his flickr/website and check out internet forever!


Wednesday, 17 March 2010

Tatjana Šuškic



Tatjana Šuškic
Belgrade, Serbia


















What is your liaison to art and photography?

I was always interested in art, especially in literature and films. Couple of years ago I started thinking about photography as something I could really enjoy doing. I like being the observer. I love the plurality of meanings that art and photography, as a form of art, give us.


What do you consider to be the most difficult part in photography?

The most difficult part in photography for me is to be spontaneous but meaningful. To tell the story in a light way with ironic allusions, sense of humor and wit.


Describe Belgrade in three words.

I talked to my friends about this question and these words came up: gray, decadence, illusion, instability, restlessness, diversity, perversity, mimicry, streets, faces, eclectic, in-between, smoke and dust, down up down, girls, tiredness, loneliness, sex.


“Photography is truth.” Do you agree?

Photography is truth? Yes, I agree, but sometimes the truth isn’t important in photography. I think that life in front of the camera can be more realistic than the reality or what we want reality to look like.


Is there something you feel you will love doing for the rest of your life?

I love cooking …riding my bicycle…travel. I would love to learn how to play the piano one day.


Who would you have given the Oscar for best picture this year?

I didn’t like the official selection…most of those films I didn’t even see. I would give the Oscar to The White Ribbon, Michael Haneke.


If you were to name a café or restaurant, what would you name it?

I think about that often. I still don’t have an answer…maybe Heart Games that crossed my mind now or Play Sometimes, it’s a verse from my sister’s poem.


One band/musician whose music you have never gotten tired of?

I can’t imagine my life without music… I never get tired of Gal Costa, Nina Simone, Charles Aznavour, Erik Satie, Tindersticks, Bryan Ferry, Beach House, Jana Hunter…
Now I am listening to wonderful Shangri-Las – Out In The Streets.


If you were to recreate pictures of a photographer as part of an art project, whose work would you chose to work with?

I would love to (re)create pictures of many photographers, like Cindy Sherman, Araki, my favorite Nan Goldin, Laura Letinsky, Hellen van Meene – her beautiful portraits of girls and young woman. Lately the photos of Clemence de Limburg, Stephen Shore, and Ali Bosworth fascinate me…


Curiouser than ever, be sure to take a look at her work!

Wednesday, 10 March 2010

Evan Hawke


Evan Hawke
Los Angeles
flickr














What got you interested into photography?

I grew up in a family of photographers, 2 of my aunts, my uncle, and my grandpa, and they always encouraged me to take pictures. Also my parents used to take me to a ton of photography exhibits.


Do you have concrete future plan around photography or art?

I plan on studying photography at some college in CA or NY, but after that i'm not so sure.


What are you most likely to say/shout if you're very positively surprised about the way a picture came out to be?

FUCK YEA!!


Are you more of a novel, scientific books or magazine reader?

I either read books about treehouse design or photography picture books.


What is you preference: online or printed media?

Printed media.


Digital or traditional watch?

Traditional pocket watch.


What do you like about the fisheye lens especially?

hahhaa i just love how it distorts reality & how you can get so much more in the frame.


You could eat ... everyday for a month without getting bored.

Eel sushi.


Is there an artist who you think deserves way more attention?

No, not really.


Is time money?

Totz, You could be makin' bank instead of wasting time doing something stupid.


Is there somthing in fashion right now that you never really liked?

Platform shoes.


Who would you like to go on a photoshoot with?

Kriskidd.


You have some pictures of your friends, do they engage in photography, too?

Some do, but they aren't so good. hahah


Liking to look forward to the coming seasons, whats the best cooling drink in summer?

Lemonade. mah favv drnkk.




15 years old. Eel sushi, not so much. Checking out his flickr, yes. Be sure to take a look!

Thursday, 4 March 2010

T. Reilly Hodgson




















Can you give an introduction to your "All Kinds of Danger" zine?

All Kinds of Danger was a small zine I made in 2007. In 2005-06 I sang in a hardcore band, so the zine is sort of a photo journal from 2 of the small tours we did. It was a really fun part of my life. I ended up giving most of the copies away to friends and band mates so I wanted to share it online with the people who missed out on the real thing.


Why was the latest zine of Blood of the Young named "Exteens"?

Exteens is a photobook I put together with Dimitri Karakostas, Dave Geeting, and Hannah Myall. We are all in our early 20s and I feel that the work we put together shows a collective feeling of awkwardness towards growing up. That's not actually Blood of the Young's latest issue though. We just threw a release party last weekend for our 1st anniversary issue. We put together a small black and white journal of some of our favourite submissions from the past year. Molested Youth, Mature Situations, and Pissed to the Eye played, everyone was shirtless, sweaty, and going wild. Such a great time. We made 100 zines and you should be able to get one on the Blood of the Young site sometime soon if you want.


On Blood of the Young Zine you guys cover different kinds of arts, do you have a personal favourite?

I don't think I do. I would be very bored and uninspired if all I did was look at and take photos. I grew up on skateboard graphics and graffiti and have studied fine art so it's all fair game in my books.


Would you say it's easy or rather difficult to describe what one likes in a photograph?

I'd like to say that it should be easy, but I'll admit to having a folder of images that I can't explain to myself yet.


What about your street project. How did you come up with it?

I have been living back in my home town for just over a year now since moving back from Vancouver. It's been a really odd experience and when I saw the billboard wasn't being used on our main road I thought I might use it to say Hello in one way or another. I have been working on the street in one way or another for a very long time so to do an installation like that comes very naturally to me. I put it up on a Sunday afternoon with a ladder and a good friend of mine. Most of the prints are still there.


You may ressurect one dead person to do an interview with. Who will it be? What would probably be your first question?

I would probably resurrect GG Allin. I'm not sure I'd have time to ask him any questions though because Zombie GG Allin would probably be a really pissed off guy.


Which online zines do you like?

To be honest the last one I looked at was Romka's new issue. I have been getting a lot of really, really great stuff in my mailbox to review on Blood of the Young lately so I'm putting most of my attention to things I can hold in my hands.


When you're 60 years old you will ...

Be able to tell a lot of great stories. I hope.


What was the occasion?

This was taken at a house party 2 winters ago. It was freezing outside and so it was literally the most packed house I have ever seen in my life, shoulder to shoulder with teenagers basement to 2nd floor. This wave of kids is watching my friends' punk band play in the living room. I also took that photo of the kids making out this party. It ended up with cops storming in through all the doors and getting shut down so we went to the bar.


Your favourite sandwich?

Two slices of pepperoni pizza.



It's fun, it's art, it's life, so be sure to check out his work and, of course if you haven't already done so, go to Blood of the Young Zine.